Perception of IT Security in Times of Crisis

What does happen to IT Security in times of crisis? The change of behaviour and rush to provide new services can be detrimental to IT Security. We are witnessing it these days. From a broad perspective, there are at least two major sides to it: IT service providers and (new) users.

In case of an crisis like COVID-19 which we are just now experiencing, IT service providers are requested to provide new services in extremely short time and to improve the already existing ones. But in IT, rush does not usually go well with security. Take as an example what has just happened in Italy: the government has charged the state pension fund (INPS) to provide subsidies for COVID-19 to no less than 5 million people (INPS usually provides pension to more than 16 million people in Italy). Obviously due to the full lock-down of the country, the procedure has to be done online. So the new IT services to request and manage the subsidies went online, and according to the news, an epic IT security failure followed: availability and in part integrity and confidentiality were violated.

Is it possible to manage in IT at the same time extremely tight and aggressive schedules and security? I believe so, but only if security is embedded in everything we do in IT.

But I believe that IT security, at least for the IT as it is nowdays, requires also the users to be aware of it and to behave accordingly. Due to COVID-19, we have all been required or strongly adviced to move many activities to online services, from work to school, shopping etc. But the physical world has very different characteristic from the virtual Internet world.

For example, consider the case of a small local pro-bono association whose members used to meet in person periodically: access to the room is free, and there is freedom of speech and contribution to the association. Now think about moving these meetings to an audio/video conference in Internet, publicly announced, with free entrance and free access for all participants to audio, video, chat etc.: is this the same thing?

Definitely not.

The rules and behaviours which apply to a physical meeting, announced with paper leaflets distributed on the streets, of a small group of people in a physical room, surely do not apply to an audio/video/chat conference in Internet. What can happen if you do? Instead of the usual 20 participants, hundreds or thousands of people could show up and some could abuse the free access to audio/video/chat etc. to whichever purpose, including drugs, malware, pornography etc.

Is this a failure of the IT technology, of the service provider or of the lack of security awareness of the (new) user?

How long will it take to humanity to really comprehend the difference between the physical and the virtual world?

On Ashley-Madison passwords crack

The Ashley-Madison story just got more interesting with the news that it has been possible to crack the supposedly well encrypted users’ password. As Ars Technica (among others) reports, the account passwords have been managed with bcrypt, and this makes it practically impossible to decrypt.

But the account passwords have also been used to create tokens related to the user’s sessions. In this case the password has been hashed with the broken algorithm MD5. From the token it is then easy to recover a lowercase version of the password, and with just a few tries, in some cases even as few as 256 iterations, it is possible to recover the exact password from the bcrypt encrypted value.

This is again another confirmation that security is not a feature to add somewhere in our IT systems, but a fundamental component of each part of it. Everyone doing IT must at least be security aware . In this case it would have been enough to use the SHA2 hash algorithm instead of MD5 to prevent the cracking of the passwords.